Secure your vacation, credit card and credit card on holiday

The credit cards and credit cards have made traveling much smoother than in previous years, but there is some to think about if you bring your cards abroad. Here are the best tips from us at Big Brother.

Should you bring your card abroad? The short answer is yes, but you have to think about it because there are risks with credit cards and credit cards. The card can be stolen, and the card information can be stolen, by the staff, in the card reader (skimming) or online. Credit cards and credit cards are convenient, and it is better than carrying the whole cash with cash. As a holiday abroad usually requires a larger sum in the account, it is important to consider if you have a credit card. A better option might be to combine with a credit card. With the credit card you have no direct connection to your account and most credit cards offer a really good blocking service. Before choosing a credit card for a holiday abroad, it is good to review currency exchange fees, withdrawal fees and travel insurance details. Big Brother generally explains what you can think of when you bring your card on vacation.

It can be good with several cards and cash

It can be good with several cards and cash

If you have the opportunity to bring more than one card. If it is a credit card keep in mind that you do not have the entire cash register on the card. There is always a risk that a card will disappear, or you will have to block it because you suspect someone unauthorized has gained access to the card information. The risk is not that great, but the risk of hitting two different cards is much less. Furthermore, if you make sure that you do not have too much money on the credit card at every single moment, you reduce the “fall height” if the accident should still occur. The thief simply doesn’t get as much money. If you have the opportunity, you can refill the account to which the card is linked from the mobile bank every morning.

As with all risk management, the old council is concerned about not having all eggs in the same basket. In addition to bringing two different cards, you get better security if you also bring a certain amount in cash. You can use them when you have to pay at “shady” places, where you are unsure whether your card details will be handled safely. With a little cash in your pocket, you can also manage better if the credit card is stolen or if you have to block it. In addition, there are actually situations where cash alone is sufficient, for example in many taxis in London.

A measure of caution provides good protection

credit card

Make sure to protect the card physically. As long as you have the card in your possession, it is harder for others to use it. Always have it on you, preferably in a pocket that is not too easy to access. You can also store the credit card in the hotel room’s safe, or in the hotel’s safe (ask at reception).

Protect your PIN. It can’t be said often enough: if someone snaps up your code, the road is open to your money. Looking over the shoulder, or obliquely from behind, when a person enters their code, and then stealing the card or wallet or the whole bag is a profitable classic. Hold one hand for the panel, or button with your finger curved in palm protection.

Look for bad signs

Look for bad signs

Watch out for tapping machines that look “weird”. An ATM with strange colors, which have no known logos, which is broken or worn may indicate that it has been tampered with and that someone is trying to capture your card details.

You should also watch out for withdrawal machines that charge high fees on your withdrawals. It is often about ATMs provided by operators other than banks, but even some banks can impose a fee that feels unreasonable or unnecessary.

Always choose local currency. Both when you shop and when you withdraw money from an ATM, you should choose local currency, if you get the question. Although it is tempting to see the amount in Swedish kronor, you can expect a very poor exchange rate. It might be better to convert to USD with a small calculator.

Keep an eye on your bank account

Keep an eye on your bank account

Save all receipts and match them to your bank account history. Feel free to use the same day, for example, if you have access to your mobile bank. The sooner you discover a suspicious account event, the easier it is to correct it and avoid it repeating. If you report a wrong expense quickly, it will usually be good to get your money back.

Have an emergency plan

Have an emergency plan

Always keep the lock number handy so that you can easily lock the card if it disappears or you suspect it has been hijacked. You may also want to use a combined call barring service that allows you to block the entire family’s credit cards, cell phones and other value documents with a single phone call. Don’t forget to make a police report if the card is stolen. Preferably already in place, otherwise as soon as you get home.

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